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Sorcerers

by Maurice Broaddus, Otis Whitaker, Jim Mahfood

Review

Sorcerers

From the publisher:
At thirty years old, Malik Hutchens is the black sheep of one of the most successful families in Harlem. While his cousins strive to better the family, he couch-surfs with relatives, parties with his girlfriend, and ghostwrites rhymes for local rappers for a few bucks to finance his lifestyle. When cocky Malik sells two warring rappers the same verse, he paints a target on his own back.

Then on his deathbed, his beloved grandfather, Pop-Pop, tells Malik that he is a sorcerer, in the great tradition of African sorcery born on the plains of the rift valley before the beginning of time. Now it’s Malik’s turn to step up and take his place as wielder and guardian of an ancient magic passed down through generations in order to protect the family, the people of Harlem, and the world from the forces of dark magic connected to the worst aspects of American history and the fearful creatures it has unleashed.

Left wondering if Pop-Pop suffered from hallucinations as he lay dying, Malik begins a journey of unexplained visions that make him worry about his sanity. Aided by mysterious people with mysterious powers, and pursued by people who may or may not be the rival white wizards Pop-Pop warned him about, Malik is thrown headlong into a quest that winds through the streets of Harlem, to the rural South, and places that he’s only visited in dreams. Now Malik must fulfill his destiny as both a sorcerer and a man, or fail his family, his people, and the world.

Rating: ☆☆☆☆☆

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